Proceedings of the Natural Hazards Management Workshop '95, Auckland, 28-29 November 1995

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Hull, A.G.; Coory, R. 1995 Proceedings of the Natural Hazards Management Workshop '95, Auckland, 28-29 November 1995. Lower Hutt: Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences. Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences information series 38 105 p.

Abstract: The Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences hosted the first Natural Hazards Management Workshop in November 1994 in Wellington, and together with ARC Environment hosted this one in Auckland in November 1995. The experience of New Zealand's largest regional council, ARC Environment, and the expertise of the Crown Research Institute involved in understanding the important issues related to earthquakes, volcanoes and slope instability - Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences - have been combined to build a comprehensive 2-day programme of interest to those concerned with natural hazard issues in New Zealand. The last year has seen a number of events remind us of the ever-present threat to our environment from the effects of natural hazards. The Kobe earthquake in Japan in January caused the loss of over 5000 lives and billions of dollars in repair costs. While not occurring in NZ, the earthquake released about 10 times less energy than the earthquake expected to occur under Wellington in association with movement along the Wellington fault. Floods in the lower Hauraki Plains were a reminder of the effects of heavy rain in many parts of New Zealand. At this Workshop we will compare how flood planning and management dealt with the ''real thing''. The eruption of Ruapehu almost exactly 50 years after its last significant eruption has reminded all New Zealanders that volcanic hazards can directly affect a wide area and almost half the population of New Zealand. The Workshop will address the very significant threat of volcanic eruptions in Auckland City. Another 12 months sees the ongoing development of natural hazard assessment in many regions and districts in New Zealand. The Resource Management Act has now been in place for 4 years. Resource managers and planners are continuing their efforts to understand better the location and probable effects of natural hazards within areas under their jurisdiction. In some regions the process of hazard assessment is now almost complete, and the challenge of developing robust and publicly acceptable policies and rules has now to be met by planners, engineers and elected representatives. In other regions and districts the hazard assessment process is being planned or in its early stages. In this Workshop we hope that the wide experience of many professionals engages in natural hazard work - from scientific study through to plan preparation and resource consents - can be shared freely to increase understanding of the important issues. (auth/JIH)