Out on a LIM : the role of Land Information Memorandum in natural hazard management (print copy)

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Saunders, W.S.A.; Mathieson, J.E. 2016 Out on a LIM : the role of Land Information Memorandum in natural hazard management. Lower Hutt, N.Z.: GNS Science. GNS Science miscellaneous series 95. v, 97 p.

Abstract: Land Information Memorandum (LIM) contributes to the management of natural hazards by providing information to property owners and potential purchasers. LIMs were included into the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act (1987) in 1992, and after more than two decades of being enacted, there is still a lot of confusion and inconsistent approaches to managing information requirements within LIMs. The aim of this report is to document how natural hazard information is represented in LIMs produced in the Wellington Region. The following questions underpin the research: 1. What is the role of the LIM in communicating natural hazard information? 2. When should information be included in a LIM? 3. What improvements could be made to the LIM system? The LIM can be used as static means of communicating site specific natural hazards information and the potential risk associated with the purchase of a property. Additionally, the information in the LIM is able to be updated more easily than the district plan, and can generally hold the most up to date information about a property. This makes the LIM a valuable tool for disseminating important information to the public about a hazard, and the potential risks associated with a property. The research identified a number of challenges and opportunities with LIMs that currently hinder the effectiveness of them being able to effectively communicate information to the public. Councils have struggled with developing a consistent approach to effectively deliver a LIM within the statutory timeframes, while balancing the requirements of providing information. The type and level of information included varies considerably, and the within the Wellington Region the natural hazards information has been used inconsistently. The LIM is considered to be council’s biggest exposure to liability, making it vitally important for councils to get it right. Three levels of recommendations have been made at national, regional, and local level scales. These include a full review of the LIM system; improving regional and district information sharing; and recommendations for information providers. (auth)

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