Seismic experiment Ross Ice Shelf 1990/91 : characteristics of the seismic reflection data.

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Melhuish, A.; Bannister, S.C.; ten Brink, U.; Beaudoin, B.; Stern, T. 1993 Seismic experiment Ross Ice Shelf 1990/91 : characteristics of the seismic reflection data. Lower Hutt: Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences science report 93/06 45 p.


Abstract: The Transantarctic Mountains, with a length of 3000-3500 km and elevations of up to 4500 m, are one of the major Cenozoic mountain ranges in the world and are by far the most striking example of rift-shoulder mountains. Over the 1990-1991 austral summer Seismic Experiment Ross Ice Shelf (SERIS) was carried out across the Transantarctic Mountain front, between latitudes 82 degrees to 83 degrees S, in order to investigate the transition zone between the rifted area of the Ross Embayment and the uplifted Transantarctic Mountains. This experiment involved a 140 km long seismic reflection profile together with a 96 km long coincident wide-angle reflection/refraction profile. Gravity and relative elevation (using barometric pressure) were also measured along the profile. The primary purpose was to examine the boundary between the rift system and the uplifted rift margin (represented by the Transantarctic Mountains) using modern multi-channel crustal reflection/refraction techniques. The results provide insight into crustal structure across the plate boundary. SERIS also represented one of the first large-scale and modern multi-channel seismic experiments in the remote interior of Antarctica. As such, the project was designed to test different seismic acquisition techniques which will be involved in future seismic exploration of the continent. This report describes the results from the analysis of the acquisition tests as well as detailing some of the characteristics of the reflection seismic data. (auths.)