Report on the New Zealand Antarctic Programme Event K105 1993/94 : pollutant transport and monitoring in soils and meltwaters on Ross Island and Victoria Land

SKU:
SR_1994-07-pdf
$5.00
(Inc. GST)
$4.35
(Ex. GST)
Write a Review

Sheppard, D.S.; Campbell, I.B.; Claridge, G.G.C. 1994 Report on the New Zealand Antarctic Programme Event K105 1993/94 : pollutant transport and monitoring in soils and meltwaters on Ross Island and Victoria Land. Lower Hutt: Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences science report 94/07 14 p.


Abstract: The proper and responsible management of the impacts on the Antarctic environment of New Zealand's operations requires both a knowledge of the natural and impacted state of the environments, and an understanding of the processes by which the impacts are modified by natural processes. In this programme we are investigating the nature and processes controlling the movement of contaminants in soils and meltwaters. In the absence of the data and understanding of the processes, management decisions aimed at protecting the environment, if proper care is being exercised, may well be overly conservative. In the 1993/94 season we continued with our programme of sampling soils and meltwaters in Ross Island and in the Wright Valley, at and about Scott Base, Capes Evans and Royds, and about Vanda Station, along the Onyx River, and at Marble point. The samples were taken in January 1994. A total of 144 soil samples were collected for analysis for leachable components, both major components and trace metals. Twenty five water samples have been collected for mercury analysis. A repeat of an investigation into the movement of an artificially applied tracer to the ground surface (LiCl solution) was begun in a contrasting climatic environment (the Wright Valley as compared to Ross Island at Scott Base) by setting up a series of 1 m x 1 m plots and control sites on the opposite side of the lake to Vanda Station. The sites were sampled four days after establishment to determine the initial condition, and the intention was to re-sample in subsequent years in order to measure the rate of migration of the salt through soils. We have no scientific results to report resulting from from the work in the 1993/94 season since considerable analytical on the samples collected is first required to be undertaken in our laboratories in New Zealand. (auth)