Kinematics of the New Zealand plate boundary : field report on the 1999 GPS survey of the Wellington / Wairarapa networks and Tararua Precipitation Experiment (TARPEX)

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Matheson, D.W. 2000 Kinematics of the New Zealand plate boundary : field report on the 1999 GPS survey of the Wellington / Wairarapa networks and Tararua Precipitation Experiment (TARPEX). Lower Hutt: Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences. Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences science report 2000/17 97 p.

Abstract: The Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences has continued to collect GPS data since 1992 at various geodetic sites in the Wellington/Wairarapa Region, for the purpose of studying ongoing tectonic deformation. This report consists of two parts. Part A documents surveys undertaken in January and February/March 1999, which reoccupied the Wellington/Wairarapa network, describing the logistics of the campaign, identifying the stations occupied and the data collected. The aim of the January/March measurements was as follows. 1. Repeat the Wellington/Wairarapa GPS network, previously measured in March 1998, February/March 1996 and partially measured during January/March 1995. Part B documents surveys undertaken in April/May 1999 as part of the Tararua Precipitation Experiment (TARPEX), and additional observations undertaken at existing 1875 and 1911 Tararua triangulation stations. TARPEX was a collaborative meteorological field campaign involving the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, Victoria University, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research and the Wellington Regional Council. The aims of the TARPEX GPS measurements were as follows. 1. Deploy twelve GPS receivers (many equipped with Paroscientific Met-3 pressure sensors) at both existing and new survey stations in two transects across the Tararua ranges for approximately a four-week observation period. To investigate the use of GPS measurements, in particular precipitable water (PW) retrievals both in the analysis of specific rainfall events and also for more general weather forecasting using computer weather models. 2. Reoccupy the remaining stations in the 1875 and 1911 Tararua triangulation networks that have not previously been observed with GPS, as part of a study of the evolution of strain across the Tararua ranges. 3. Add new survey stations to the Wellington Tararua ranges region as part of continued network densification.(auth/PM)