Proximal impacts of the ~1305 AD Kaharoa eruption on modern day New Zealand

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SR_2002-018-pdf
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Johnston, D.M.; Nairn, I.; Martin, R. 2002 Proximal impacts of the ~1305 AD Kaharoa eruption on modern day New Zealand . Lower Hutt: Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences. Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences science report 2002/18 28 p.

Abstract: The ~1305AD Kaharoa eruptive episode from Mt Tarawera in the Okataina Volcanic Centre was the largest, and only rhyolitic, eruption to have occurred in New Zealand during the last 1000 years. A Kaharoa-type eruption occurring today would have widespread impacts on the New Zealand environment, infrastructure, agriculture, forestry, industry, and general economic activity, producing long-term management issues for all sectors of society. The damaging, but survivable, effects and impacts of the widespread Kaharoa distal tephra falls across the North Island have been previously described by Johnston et al. (2000). In this report we model the catastrophic impacts of (a) the Kaharoa proximal eruptives within 10-20 km from Tarawera, and (b) the post-eruption flooding in the Tarawera River from Lake Tarawera to the Bay of Plenty coast. (auth)