Planning for the development of land on or close to active faults : a study of the adoption and use of the Active Fault Guidelines

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Becker, J.S.; Saunders, W.S.A.; Van Dissen, R.J. 2005 Planning for the development of land on or close to active faults : a study of the adoption and use of the Active Fault Guidelines . Lower Hutt: Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences. Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences science report 2005/16 63 p.

Abstract: New Zealand is located in a dynamic geologic environment, at the edge of two converging tectonic plates. As a result of the movement of these plates, New Zealand is subject to a variety of natural hazards including earthquake-related hazards such as ground shaking, fault rupture and ground deformation. . Lower Hutt: Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences. Planning for the Development of Land on or Close to Active Faults (also known as the Active Fault Guidelines) is a set of guidelines published by the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) that aim to assist in planning for the avoidance and/or mitigation of fault rupture hazard. The Active Fault Guidelines were first available in July 2003 in draft form as an interim document. In mid-2004 the final guidelines were sent by MfE to local authorities and other interested parties. The guidelines are also accessible via the Quality Planning website (www.qualityplanning.org.nz) and the general MfE website (www.mfe.govt.nz). Two years on from the release of the draft, this follow up study assesses whether planners and other relevant professionals have used/adopted the guidelines, how they have used them, whether they have found the guidelines useful or not, and how they can be improved. The study shows that a reasonable number of local authorities are aware and supportive of the guidelines. A few authorities have started using the guidance (adapting it to suit their local situation), but others have found some of the resulting issues too difficult to resolve and have chosen not to implement the recommendations for the present time. Even if authorities are supportive it will take time, and may require input from geotechnical specialists, before planning for fault rupture can become truly integrated into local authority processes and planning documents. (auth)