Alternative design approaches to achieve tolerable earthquake impacts in buildings : updated research plan and progress report

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Mieler, M.W.; Uma, S.R. 2014 Alternative design approaches to achieve tolerable earthquake impacts in buildings : updated research plan and progress report. Lower Hutt, N.Z.: GNS Science. GNS Science report 2014/32 31 p.

Abstract: This report outlines a detailed research plan for Project 1 of the Post-Earthquake Functioning of Cities (PEC) programme, and also documents progress made towards specific tasks within the research plan. The research plan comprises five major tasks that aim to improve the understanding of how the myriad community systems and infrastructures interact with each other in order to develop performance criteria for buildings and lifelines that reliably achieve a level of performance that both meets stakeholder expectations and enhances community resilience. The five major tasks of the research plan are: 1. Develop detailed fault trees that formalize relationships between component damage and overall building performance for several different building occupancy categories. 2. Refine and expand the community-centric framework for connecting community-level resilience goals to specific performance objectives for buildings and lifelines. 3. Compile and analyse longitudinal data from Christchurch to understand the aggregated impacts of building and lifeline damage on community resilience. 4. Conduct surveys of various stakeholder groups to elicit performance expectations both at the community and building levels. 5. Perform a case study of Wellington to evaluate the expected performance of buildings and lifelines in a hypothetical earthquake scenario. The output of these tasks will be a clearly defined hierarchy of resilience goals and performance targets for a community and the myriad buildings and lifelines within its built environment, which ultimately can serve as a consistent and transparent foundation for hazard mitigation strategies and revisions to building codes and engineering standards. (auth)